Defoe's Footprints

Defoe's Footprints

Essays in Honour of Maximillian E. Novak

eBook - 2009
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Univ of Toronto Pr

The 443 letters contained in the cartulary deal with practical matters of governance such as homages, fiefs, and the rights of lordship, and are here used by Evergates as a dossier for observing the practices of a major French principality and its aristocracy in the first two decades of the thirteenth century.


With attention to Defoe's neglected writings as well as to his important works, this volume uncovers his distance from and influence on modern literature, paying tribute to Maximillian E. Novak by presenting new ideas about, and new readings of, Daniel Defoe.

In Defoe's Footprints, essays by prominent scholars of eighteenth-century literature salute Maximillian E. Novak's influence upon the study of Daniel Defoe. Best known today as the author of Robinson Crusoe, Defoe was a prolific writer in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries who wrote novels, essays, pamphlets, and poems. Widely extending Novak's perspectives, this volume explores Defoe's place in the English novel and in literary developments of mimesis, realism, and popular mythology.

The contributors locate Defoe in new ways within the complex symbolism and discourse of a turbulent world of burgeoning capitalism, Protestantism, imperialism, and economic speculation. With attention to Defoe's neglected writings as well as to his important works, this volume uncovers his distance from and influence on modern literature, paying tribute to Maximillian E. Novak by presenting new ideas about, and new readings of, Daniel Defoe.


In Defoe's Footprints, essays by prominent scholars of eighteenth-century literature salute Maximillian E. Novak's influence upon the study of Daniel Defoe. Best known today as the author ofRobinson Crusoe, Defoe was a prolific writer in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries who wrote novels, essays, pamphlets, and poems. Widely extending Novak's perspectives, this volume explores Defoe's place in the English novel and in literary developments of mimesis, realism, and popular mythology.

The contributors locate Defoe in new ways within the complex symbolism and discourse of a turbulent world of burgeoning capitalism, Protestantism, imperialism, and economic speculation. With attention to Defoe's neglected writings as well as to his important works, this volume uncovers his distance from and influence on modern literature, paying tribute to Maximillian E. Novak by presenting new ideas about, and new readings of, Daniel Defoe.


The Cartulary of Countess Blanche of Champagne examines the countess' twenty-one-year regency (1201-22) through her cartulary - a manuscript copy of legal and otherwise public documents usually intended as an archival aid and as a security duplicate. Surviving intact to this day, the 1224 volume is unusual in that it was commissioned as a personal, commemorative document for the countess in retirement, after a successful career in which she preserved the county from a divisive civil war, expanded the county's borders, and transformed comital-baronial relationships.

The 443 letters contained in the cartulary deal with practical matters of governance such as homages, fiefs, and the rights of lordship, and are here used by Theodore Evergates as a dossier for observing the practices of a major French principality and its aristocracy in the first two decades of the thirteenth century.



Book News
This festschrift for Defoe scholar Maximillian E Novak began at a 2002 conference held at UCLA. The articles, edited by Maniquis (English, UCLA) and Fisher (comparative world literature and classics, California State University, Long Beach) reflect the impact of Novak's work on the study of Defoe and eighteenth century literature. While Robinson Crusoe is the book most discussed, Defoe's other books and his writings on economics are also treated. Subjects vary from the ethereal, literally air and silence in Defoe, to concrete opinions on capitalism with the South Sea Bubble floating between the two. Several essays put Defoe in the context of his time while the last ones discuss his influence on James Joyce and the way in which Robinson Crusoe has escaped his text to become a universal iconic character. All of the essays pay tribute to the work of the honoree. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell North Amer
In Defoe's Footprints, essays by prominent scholars of eighteenth-century literature salute Maximillian E. Novak's influence upon the study of Daniel Defoe. Best known today as the author of Robinson Crusoe, Defoe was a prolific writer in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries who wrote novels, essays, pamphlets, and poems. Widely extending Novak's perspectives, this volume explores Defoe's place in the English novel and in literary developments of mimesis, realism, and popular mythology.
The contributors locate Defoe in new ways within the complex symbolism and discourse of a turbulent world of burgeoning capitalism, Protestantism, imperialism, and economic speculation. With attention to Defoe's neglected writings as well as to his important works, this volume uncovers his distance from and influence on modern literature, paying tribute to Maximillian E. Novak by presenting new ideas about, and new readings of, Daniel Defoe.

Publisher: Toronto, Ontario ;, Buffalo, New York ;, London, England :, University of Toronto Press,, 2009
Copyright Date: ©2009
ISBN: 9781442697690
9780802099211
Characteristics: 1 online resource (280 pages) : illustrations

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