Latin American Identities After 1980

Latin American Identities After 1980

eBook - 2009
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Univ of Toronto Pr

Latin American Identities After 1980 takes an interdisciplinary approach to Latin American social and cultural identities. With broad regional coverage, and an emphasis on Canadian perspectives, it focuses on Latin American contact with other cultures and nations. Its sound scholarship combines evidence-based case studies with the Latin American tradition of the essay, particularly in areas where the discourse of the establishment does not match political, social, and cultural realities and where it is difficult to uncover the purposely covert.

This study of the cultural and social Latin America begins with an interpretation of the new Pax Americana, designed in the 1980s by the North in agreement with the Southern elites. As the agreement ties the hands of national governments and establishes new regional and global strategies, a pan–Latin American identity is emphasized over individual national identities. The multi-faceted impacts and effects of globalization in Bolivia, Ecuador, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and the Caribbean are examined, with an emphasis on social change, the transnationalization and commodification of Latin American and Caribbean arts and the adaptation of cultural identities in a globalized context as understood by Latin American authors writing from transnational perspectives.



Wilfrid Laurier Univ Pr

Latin American Identities After 1980 takes an interdisciplinary approach to Latin American social and cultural identities. With broad regional coverage, and an emphasis on Canadian perspectives, it focuses on Latin American contact with other cultures and nations. Its sound scholarship combines evidence-based case studies with the Latin American tradition of the essay, particularly in areas where the discourse of the establishment does not match political, social, and cultural realities and where it is difficult to uncover the purposely covert.

This study of the cultural and social Latin America begins with an interpretation of the new Pax Americana, designed in the 1980s by the North in agreement with the Southern elites. As the agreement ties the hands of national governments and establishes new regional and global strategies, a pan–Latin American identity is emphasized over individual national identities. The multi-faceted impacts and effects of globalization in Bolivia, Ecuador, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and the Caribbean are examined, with an emphasis on social change, the transnationalization and commodification of Latin American and Caribbean arts and the adaptation of cultural identities in a globalized context as understood by Latin American authors writing from transnational perspectives.



Book News
For undergraduate and graduate students and scholars, Yovanovich (Latin American literature, U. of Guelph, Canada) and Huras, a PhD candidate at the U. of Toronto, assemble 14 essays that discuss Latin American political, social, and cultural development and identity from 1980 to the present. This period came after violent unrest in which Latin America attempted to transform its class and social structure and after the Latin American Boom, inspired by a literary movement for a continental identity. Rather than focusing on theories or ideologies, a group of Canadian scholars of law, sociology and anthropology, Latin American studies, Spanish, and other fields consider what it means to be Latin American in an age of globalization. Topics include North-South relationships in the Americas, the impact of global movements on indigenous situations, the effect of globalization on the liberation of women, foreign and local realities, the rise of new Socialist governments, linguistic homogenization, legal protections for migrant workers in Canada, and the changes that global markets are bringing to Latin American music, sports, writing, and art. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Ingram Publishing Services
"Latin American Identities After 1980" takes an interdisciplinary approach to Latin American social and cultural identities. With broad regional coverage, and an emphasis on Canadian perspectives, it focuses on Latin American contact with other cultures and nations. Its sound scholarship combines evidence-based case studies with the Latin American tradition of the essay, particularly in areas where the discourse of the establishment does not match political, social, and cultural realities and where it is difficult to uncover the purposely covert.

This study of the cultural and social Latin America begins with an interpretation of the new Pax Americana, designed in the 1980s by the North in agreement with the Southern elites. As the agreement ties the hands of national governments and establishes new regional and global strategies, a panLatin American identity is emphasized over individual national identities. The multi-faceted impacts and effects of globalization in Bolivia, Ecuador, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and the Caribbean are examined, with an emphasis on social change, the transnationalization and commodification of Latin American and Caribbean arts and the adaptation of cultural identities in a globalized context as understood by Latin American authors writing from transnational perspectives.



Blackwell Publishing
Latin American Identities after 1980 takes an interdisciplinary approach to Latin American social and cultural identities. With broad regional coverage and an emphasis on Conadian perspectives, it focuses on Latin American contact with other cultures and nations. Its sound scholarship combines evidence-based case studies with the Latin American tradition of the essay, particularly in areas where the discourse of the establishment does not match political, social, and cultural realities and where it is difficult to uncover the purposely covert.

This study of the cultural and social Latin America begins with an interpretation of the new Pax Americana, designed in the 1980s by the North in agreement with the Southern elites. As the agreement ties the hands of national governments and establishes new regional and global strategies, a pan-Latin American identity is emphasized over individual national identities. The multi-faceted impacts and effects of globalization in Bolivia, Ecuador, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and the Caribbean are examined, with an emphasis on social change, the transnationalization and commodification of Latin American and Caribbean arts, and the adaptation of cultural identities in a globalized context as understood by Latin American authors writing from transnational perspectives.

Publisher: Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2009
ISBN: 9781554582136
155458213X
9781554583003
1554583004
9781554581832
1554581834
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: Yovanovich, Gordana 1956-
Huras, Amy 1983-

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