Women, Work and the French State

Women, Work and the French State

Labour Protection and Social Patriarchy, 1879-1919

eBook - 1989
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In France, during the 1880s and 1890s, the protection of women and girls in the workplace was advocated by sociologists, social economists, union leaders, enlightened industrialists, and politicians of virtually every ideological hue. In response, laws were enacted restricting not only the number of hours and the time of day that women could work but also their access to dangerous trades. Mary Lynn Stewart argues that these restrictions, though initiated to protect women and girls, were actually a method of exploiting women's dual role of short-time wage worker and unpaid housewife and mother.

Stewart traces the implementation of these laws in factories with an examination of the work of the predominantly bourgeois inspectors and their relations with employers and workers. She shows how employers and workers alike at first evaded, then slowly adjusted to the restrictive legislation. By identifying the curious mixture of reformers involved - including union organizers and enlightened employers, socialists and Social Catholics - and investigating the motives behind their campaign for protective labour legislation in France, Stewart reveals that these laws were conceived as barriers to exclude women from male job monopolies.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
In France, during the 1880s and 1890s, the protection of women and girls in the workplace was advocated by sociologists, social economists, union leaders, enlightened industrialists, and politicians of virtually every ideological hue. In response, laws were enacted restricting not only the number of hours and the time of day that women could work but also their access to dangerous trades. Mary Lynn Stewart argues that these restrictions, though initiated to protect women and girls, were actually a method of exploiting women's dual role of short-time wage worker and unpaid housewife and mother.
In France, during the 1880s and 1890s, the protection of women and girls in the workplace was advocated by sociologists, social economists, union leaders, enlightened industrialists, and politicians of virtually every ideological hue. In response, laws were enacted restricting not only the number of hours and the time of day that women could work but also their access to dangerous trades. Mary Lynn Stewart argues that these restrictions, though initiated to protect women and girls, were actually a method of exploiting women's dual role of short-time wage worker and unpaid housewife and mother.

Stewart traces the implementation of these laws in factories with an examination of the work of the predominantly bourgeois inspectors and their relations with employers and workers. She shows how employers and workers alike at first evaded, then slowly adjusted to the restrictive legislation. By identifying the curious mixture of reformers involved - including union organizers and enlightened employers, socialists and Social Catholics - and investigating the motives behind their campaign for protective labour legislation in France, Stewart reveals that these laws were conceived as barriers to exclude women from male job monopolies.

Stewart traces the implementation of these laws in factories with an examination of the work of the predominantly bourgeois inspectors and their relations with employers and workers. She shows how employers and workers alike at first evaded, then slowly adjusted to the restrictive legislation. By identifying the curious mixture of reformers involved - including union organizers and enlightened employers, socialists and Social Catholics - and investigating the motives behind their campaign for protective labour legislation in France, Stewart reveals that these laws were conceived as barriers to exclude women from male job monopolies.

Publisher: Kingston, Ont. : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ă1989
ISBN: 9780773562059
0773562052
9780773507043
0773507043
Characteristics: 1 online resource (ix, 277 pages) : illustrations

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